Programs

Living Waters International's programs address basic human and spiritual needs of the peoples of East Africa. We assist Roman Catholic missionaries and the people they serve. Our programs include student sponsorship and seminarians' support. Other projects include: construction of formation houses, schools, student hostels, churches, village chapels, health clinics, food relief, tuition assistance and teachers' salaries at Catholic schools, religious formation, retreats and support for the daily living expenses of religious, training of lay catechists, housing for the poor, wells, and solar and wind power facilities. We invite you to browse our various programs.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Cluny Health Clinic - Igunga, Tabora, Tanzania

Grant Dollars Help Less Privileged Women to Have a Safe and Sterile Environment to Birth Babies

p1

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Cluny (SSJC) know well the many dangers that a poor woman in a remote village in East Africa faces when becoming pregnant. Hospitals, even small health clinics, are few and poor economic conditions discourage doctors and midwives from working in these areas. As a result, women fail to have qualified personnel attending them. Many terminated pregnancies could be prevented if only medical facilities were available.

Food shortages and lack of education are other major impediments. Poor nutrition contributes to under-weight mothers and babies whose immune systems fail. Lack of maternal education contributes to the problem and age is a factor as young girls find themselves pregnant. Young girls often must walk a long distance to a clinic and end up having her child on the way.

p1

Bribery and greed can also often quickly turn things ugly when a father can't afford to pay the doctor his requested "bribe money". And corrupt politicians will use government money to send a relative to a different country to have their child when that money could have been used to improve poorly equipped and unsafe clinics.

Sister Preethi Vayilil, Head Nurse of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Cluny Health Clinic - Igunga, Tabora, says that at their clinic they provide delivery services to thirty-five to forty cases each month, plus some twenty-plus more cases that are being treated for diseases during pregnancy. "In some cases women need to be treated because of an incomplete abortion." With grant dollars received in 2013, the clinic now has two labor tables and a maternity ward that accommodates fourteen women. Sister expresses her gratitude by saying, "We are very thankful for the kind-hearted individuals and foundations that have contributed to the financial and moral support of our ministry here at the clinic."